I work in book publishing.
You're my favorite.
Time to shine.

Time to shine.

It’s the birthday of editor Ernest Percival Rhys, born in London (1859). He worked as a mining engineer, and he set up a makeshift library with his own books and led book discussions for the coal miners. Then a publisher got him confused with a scholar named John Rhys and approached him about editing a series of books called Camelot Classics. Ernest Rhys turned out to be a good editor, and he moved on from Camelot Classics to work for the publishing house J.M. Dent and Company. Dent and Rhys conceived of a series of inexpensive works of classic literature, 1,000 titles in all. Rhys came up with the name: “Everyman’s Library,” from the medieval morality play Everyman. In the play, the character Knowledge says to Everyman: “Everyman, I will go with thee / and be thy guide, / In thy most need to go / by thy side.” When Rhys died in 1946, 952 volumes of the Everyman’s Library had been published.

— from the Publishing, You Can Do It Too! files, in today’s Writers Almanac, which also has a great Charles Simic poem. 

Read Gabriel García Márquez with his longtime translator, Edith Grossman →

Well this is interesting: The Center for Fiction has posted their Fall reading groups, and one of them is an opportunity to discuss the late great García Márquez with his finest translator, Edith Grossman.

The Center for Fiction, by the bye, is a* literary nonprofit dedicated to celebrating fiction. If you’re not a member, you can still receive their newsletter missives here. They’re short, non-intrusive, and can make you feel better about all the bookish goings on about town that you’re not attending, but could, if you were that sort of person. 

*the!

bestrooftalkever:

I see Snoopy who do you guys see?

bestrooftalkever:

I see Snoopy who do you guys see?

Left Hand of Darkness

Discovering Innovation in Digital Books →

I’m going to be on a podcast panel tomorrow with some very smart folks, in case you’d like to listen. I’m practicing my NPR presenter voice, which I haven’t used in a long time. 

Summer Friday let’s go.

Summer Friday let’s go.

Pied Beauty

Glory be to God for dappled things—
    For skies of cople-colour as a brindled cow;
        For rose-moles all in stipple upon trout that swim;
Fresh-firecoal chestnut-falls; finches’ wings;
    Landsape plotted and pieced—fold, fallow, and plough;
        And all trades, their gear and tackle and trim.
All things counter, original, spare, strange;
    Whatever is fickle, freckled (who knows how?)
        With swift, slow; sweet, sour; adazzle, dim;
He fathers-forth whose beauty is past change:
                               Praise him.

Gerard Manley Hopkins, in today’s Writer’s Almanac.

My Struggle by Karl Ove Knausgaard: An Incomplete Review

briennewalsh:

image

I’ve spent much of the last week reading Karl Ove Knausgaard’s first two books in his “My Struggle” series, otherwise known in Norwegian as Min Kamp, a title very close to Hitler’s Mein Kamp. Apparently the latter caused a lot of controversy when the book was first released in Norway, where in a country of 5 million people, it sold 450,000 copies.

Read More

Here’s a great review of My Struggle by Brienne Walsh, who can spell Dostoevsky without having to Google it first, which I certainly can’t do and you probably can’t either, if you’re being really honest with yourself.

Jokes in jokes in jokes.

Jokes in jokes in jokes.

Realized I had used the word “ideation” non-ironically. Spent a good 5 minutes looking for a clip of Johnny Cash singing “What have I become my sweetest friend” in “Hurt.” 

This Korean facial mask’s instructions are totally a six word short story.

This Korean facial mask’s instructions are totally a six word short story.

darienlibrary:

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ
And then we come to Pat S. who has just read Regeneration by Pat Barker. “This is the first book of a WWI trilogy by Pat Barker. Set in the psychiatric convalescent hospital of Craiglockhart, Regeneration is a fictionalized account of the poet Siegfried Sassoon’s time in this facility when he had been labeled ‘mentally unbalanced’ for declaring the war a ‘senseless slaughter.’ Told through the eyes of both the patients and the physicians, Barker explores the ethical and moral ambiguities of war. It is heartrending to read the recounting of battles and frontline conditions which left healthy young men physically and psychically shattered—not necessarily at the hands of the enemy, but by virtue of the incompetence and arrogance of their own commanding officers. While not an easy read, this is certainly a provocative one.”
You Are What You Read is our “Staff Recommends” GONE WILD and features recommendations from Darien Library staff members. And you don’t have to live in Darien to receive an email with our top picks!

This series is my favorite historical literature series. Siegfried Sassoon, Robert Graves, Wilfred Owen, and W. H. R. Rivers (credited with introducing the talking cure for shell shock) are all characters. It’s generally pitched as an anti-war novel, but it’s also perfect for book lovers interested in the lives of writers in war time. 
Also, this initiative from Darien Library is lovely.

darienlibrary:

YOU ARE WHAT YOU READ

And then we come to Pat S. who has just read Regeneration by Pat Barker. “This is the first book of a WWI trilogy by Pat Barker. Set in the psychiatric convalescent hospital of Craiglockhart, Regeneration is a fictionalized account of the poet Siegfried Sassoon’s time in this facility when he had been labeled ‘mentally unbalanced’ for declaring the war a ‘senseless slaughter.’ Told through the eyes of both the patients and the physicians, Barker explores the ethical and moral ambiguities of war. It is heartrending to read the recounting of battles and frontline conditions which left healthy young men physically and psychically shattered—not necessarily at the hands of the enemy, but by virtue of the incompetence and arrogance of their own commanding officers. While not an easy read, this is certainly a provocative one.”

You Are What You Read is our “Staff Recommends” GONE WILD and features recommendations from Darien Library staff members. And you don’t have to live in Darien to receive an email with our top picks!

This series is my favorite historical literature series. Siegfried Sassoon, Robert Graves, Wilfred Owen, and W. H. R. Rivers (credited with introducing the talking cure for shell shock) are all characters. It’s generally pitched as an anti-war novel, but it’s also perfect for book lovers interested in the lives of writers in war time. 

Also, this initiative from Darien Library is lovely.

The ebook for To Kill a Mockingbird is now up for pre-order. It publishes on Tuesday, July 8.

The ebook for To Kill a Mockingbird is now up for pre-order. It publishes on Tuesday, July 8.

cvletter:

No NO Icarnt Do This Cover letter $10 Cover Letters

I think this is the best spam follow I’ve ever received.

cvletter:

No NO Icarnt Do This Cover letter $10 Cover Letters

I think this is the best spam follow I’ve ever received.

Kenneth Branaugh’s Macbeth is the most #TrueDetectiveSeason2 thing I’ve ever seen.

Kenneth Branaugh’s Macbeth is the most #TrueDetectiveSeason2 thing I’ve ever seen.